Thursday, November 5, 2015

The intricacies of disassembling RTLink/Plus

Finally, after many years of half-hearted attempts, I've finally rewritten my RTLink decode tool practically from scratch to handle disassembling the RTLink/Plus overlay management used by the later Legend entertainment games. See rtlink_decode for the result. The original version of the tool was pretty dodgy, and pretty much hardcoded to only handle the MADS games (Rex Nebular, Return of the Phantom, and Dragonsphere). In this posting, I'll go into more detail of what RTLink/Plus was for those who may be interested.

In the latter days of DOS gaming, game developers started running into a problem. Namely, that their executables were starting to hit the limits of main memory. Not every game could, or would, take advantage of scripting game content, so having all the game logic in the main executable caused the size to bloat. So what to do if your executable was now too big to fit in memory? This was the problem RTLink/Plus was designed to solve.

RTLink is essentially an overlay manager. It splits a program's compiled code into multiple different segments, and allows them to be loaded in as needed, and then replaced when code in other segments needs to execute. RTLink can handle recursive segments, with individual segments split up into their own set of swappable sub-segments. It also allows for multiple different "loading areas" in memory that can independently have their own set of segments. See this article for more general information about RTLink.

Before I go into more details of the problem this posed for disassembly, let's go over how RTLink implements the overlay manager in code. So far, I've encountered three different variations on RTLink being used in executables. What I'll call variation 1 & 2 seem to be the most common form of RTLink in games I've examined. When a program is compiled with either of these versions of RTLink/Plus, one of the segments in the code will contain the RTLink logic, as well as two main areas: the dynamic segments and the function thunks.

The segment list is a list of the dynamic segments within the application. It contains the following information:
  • The segment in memory where the dynamic segment should be loaded
  • Whether the segment is stored in the application or a secondary overlay file (Variation 1 only, version 2 only ever uses the executable).
  • The file offset and size of the segment
  • The number of relocation entries the segment has; Variation 1 only. Variation 2 has it as part of the starting header for the segment pointed to.
When a segment is needed, the above details are used to read the segment's data from file, and load it into the correct place in memory. The data for a segment consists of two parts: an initial header area, and the date/code for the segment. For variation 1, the header area simply consists of a list of relocation entries. Whereas for variation 2, the details of segment size and number of relocations are provided in a header at the start of the segment, before the relocations list.

A segment's relocation entries are used for the same purpose as relocation entries in a standard application - executables can be loaded at different locations within memory, so all segment references need to be relative to the starting point of where the program is loaded. By keeping the relocation entries for each dynamic segment together with the segment data itself, it's easier for RTLink to apply any needed segment adjustments each time a dynamic segment is loaded.

This is fine to handle shifting the segments in and out of memory, and allow them to have valid memory references, but what causes them to be loaded? The answer is the method "thunks" area of the RTLink segment. When dealing with dynamic segments, you can't just do a far call to some offset in the area of memory segments are loaded in.. you couldn't be sure that the segment you want is actually loaded, or still in memory and not unloaded by some other segment. For this purpose, the thunk list is present.

For every method in a dynamic segment that is referenced by any other segment, a thunk/stub method is created. These consist essentially of the following: a call to the RTLink manager to load the correct segment for the method, a far jump to the method in the correct memory location in the loaded segment, and a following 16-bit value specifying which segment the thunk is for. This way, the thunk method acts as a wrapper, ensuring the correct segment is loaded and passing control to the method to execute.

For variations 1 and 2, the thunk methods have some minor differences, such as version 2 using far calls to the RTLink segment loading code, and having an optional word after the segment index. The segment selector in the far jump call is also already loaded with the memory segment in variation 1, whereas in version 2 it's normally 0 initially, and then set to the correct segment when the thunk method is called. This allows variation 2 to dynamically load the segment in different places in memory, whereas variation 1 is limited to a single specific loading point.

The RTLink segment loader method also mucks around with the stack to push a new intermediate return address on the stack for when the method that's jumped to finishes. This return address points to a code fragment that also handles the case where a method in a dynamic segment calls a method in another one.. in that case, it handles reloading the original segment, so that the original caller's code can be safely returned to.

Put altogether, this scheme allows programs of practically any size needed. As the program grows, the code simply needs to be split into more and more dynamic segments which will get loaded only when needed, and remain on disk when not. Great for having big programs, but not so great for those of us interested in reverse engineering the game by disassembling the executable.

There were several problems to be solved for disassembling such games, which I'll go into now.

A standard IDA disassembly doesn't have all the code

Well, it wouldn't. If you try to disassemble an RTLink/Plus compiled game, IDA will give you an error about unused data at the end of the executable. This will be for one or more RTLink segments. Additionally, as previously mentioned, some of the code for the program can also be stored in a separate OVL (Overlay) file.

Well, I could just load the raw data for them into the disassembly, right?

Well, no. That wouldn't help much, because of all the thunk methods. They all have their references to the same area of memory where segments are expected to be loaded. If you were doing things manually, you'd need to get the details of each segment from RTLink, manually load the code and/or data into new IDA segments, and then manually adjust the thunk methods to point to those methods.

You'd also need to worry about the dynamic segment relocation entries. If you manually loaded the code for a segment, you'd have to read the list of relocation entries for the dynamic segment and manually adjust each relocation entry within the segment. Segment selectors may point to code within the segment (or another sub-segment within the loaded overall RTLink segment), to a low memory area of the executable that remains static in memory, or to the data segment (at a higher memory segment). All in all, you'd have to be extraordinarily patient to all that by hand.

So that's why you wrote rtlink_decode, right? That's what it does?
Yes and no. A bit part of what it does is indeed doing the above to create a new executable suitable for disassembly. This includes laying out all the dynamic segments sequentially (without their segment headers and relocation lists), handling relocation fixups, and the thunk methods adjusted to point to their methods in the decoded executable. However, another problem crops up in the handling of the data segment.

In my experience with RTLink, I've come across across two types of data segments:
  1. In the case of the later Legend Entertainment games, the executable has a single RTLink segment, with the remainder of the segments coming from an OVL file. The single executable segment is for the main data segment as well as a few other miscellaneous segments.
  2. In the case of the MADS games, the data segment isn't an RTLink segment, but all the RTLink segments follow it in the executable.
In both cases, we have a problem doing a proper disassembly. Executables are normally expected to have the data segment at the end of the program, because the data segment may be longer than the end of the executable. For example, a game's data segment may only have 1Kb of pre-set values which are stored in the executable, but it still requires 40Kb of unallocated/uninitialized space. That's why you'll frequently see, when you do a disassembly of a program, areas at the end of a data segment with '?' mark values, indicating the memory isn't part of the executable, so doesn't have any specific value when the program starts.

So if we did just lay the segments end to end, the data segment, coming before other dynamic segments, would end up being shorter than it should be, and a lot of the references to data within it would end up wrapping onto the following dynamic segments in the reworked executable. To avoid this,  the rtlink_decode tool ensures that the data segment falls at the end of the generated executable, after all the other segments. This, however, causes it's own share of problems. All the existing references to the data segment refer to where the data segment was expected to be loaded in memory, not to where the data segment actually is in the new executable. Because of this, all the references to the data segment in the executable have to be adjusted accordingly.

Ouch! Sounds fiddly.

It is. And took a lot of messing around to get right. Even then, that's not the entirety of the picture. For Companions of Xanth, the Legend game I used for testing when rebuilding the tool, the data segment has some extra gotcha's.. It contains segment references into the middle of the memory area RTLink segments are loaded into. Presumably these are used in some special controlled circumstances when a specific segment (or segments) are loaded to access particular data. But it's impossible to know without understanding the game a lot better. 

Worse, the presence of the references were screwing up some of the loaded dynamic segments in the disassembly, causing them to be split in half. To handle this, the tool explicitly looks for such "bad" references in the data segment, and removes the relocation entries for them. This way, the value in the data segment will remain as a static word, and the segments don't get incorrectly split up. The user can always then later manually set up a pointer to an appropriate segment if they wish. This handles the bulk of such errors, but Xanth at least, there are still references in the low part of the executable (that remains static in memory) to locations within the RTLink segments. Since I can't know which particular RTLink segment is meant to be loaded when the code they're in is called, these few remaining references will have to be later manually adjusted as well.

So that's it?

Yep. After all these years, I'm finally able to generate a (mostly valid) "decoded" executable, and produce a clean disassembly of Companions of Xanth. I also, initially, had two separate versions of the the tool, one the old hacky version for MADS games, and the legend variation for Legend-style RTLink usage. I've since updated my tool to properly handle MADS games, so now there's only the single rtlink_decode tool, and it can handle both variations 1 and 2.

Oh, wait.. what about the 3rd variation you mentioned?

Ah, yes, I didn't really get into that, did I. This version seems to be somewhat different than the other two variations. In this case, the RTLink code is stored in a separate rtlinkst.com file, and then loaded into memory. It then shifts part of the program downwards in memory, and uses it's own relocation table to manually process relocation entries on the shifted code. This variation is proving tricky to disassemble, so whilst I have located the segment list, I still need to:
  • Figure out how relocation data is encoded. I think I've located the correct data in the executable, but the code RTLink uses to update relocation entries is pretty nasty and overcomplicated.
  • How much of the start of the executable to remove so that the produced executable doesn't have any of the old code at the start of the executable that gets overwritten
  • Find the thunk methods, and see whether the existing code will handle them.

Hopefully I can quickly figure out the remaining details for the third variation soon. The goal is to have a tool that both myself and others can use in the future to help them disassemble any game that used RTLink/Plus. Then no-one else will have to go through all the frustrations that I did trying to deal with this %#@! thing.

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